Level 3 International Foundation Diploma for Higher Education Studies (Part 8)

5. Syllabus

n. Chemistry

Title Chemistry
Unit reference number R/616/8688
Credits 10
Level 3

 

Guided Learning Hours 52 hours Total Qualification Time 100 hours

 

Learning Outcomes;
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria;
The Learner can:
1.Understand atomic structure and
bonding
1.1 Describe the basic structure of atoms.
1.2. Explain the different models of atomic
structure.
1.3. Deduce the electronic configuration of
atoms and ions.
1.4. Perform calculations using relative atomic mass and relative molecular mass.
1.5. Perform calculations using chemical
formulae, balanced equations the mole
and Avogadro Constant and molar volume.
1.6. Demonstrate titration techniques and solve associated calculations.
1.7. Identify and calculate experimental
uncertainties.
1.8. Describe metallic and intramolecular
bonding and properties.
1.9. Describe intermolecular bonding and
properties.
1.10. Describe and predict the shapes of
covalent molecules and polyatomic ions
using the Valence Shell Electron Pair
Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory
2. Understand energetics, rates,
kinetics and chemical equilibria
2.1 Define examples of standard enthalpy
changes.
2.2 Demonstrate that enthalpy change can be calculated from a potential energy diagram
2.3 Explain how calorimetry can be used to
measure enthalpy changes.
2.4 Apply Hess’s Law to calculations of
enthalpy changes and bond enthalpy values.
2.5 Describe, using collision theory, the effects of concentration, pressure, surface area (particle size), temperature and collision geometry on reaction rates.
2.6 Define activation energy.
2.7 Use energy distribution diagrams to
explain the effect of temperature on
reaction rate.
2.8 Determine the order of a reaction from
experimental data and rate equations.
2.9 Calculate the rate constant and its units.
2.10 Using the rate equation, predict the rate determining step and a possible
mechanism.
2.11 Describe the equilibrium chemistry of acids and bases.
2.12 Construct equilibrium expressions.
2.13 Explain and use the terms: pH, Kw, Ka and pKa.
3. Understand the key points of
inorganic chemistry
3.1 State and explain the trends in melting and boiling points down a group and across a period.
3.2. State and explain the trends in covalent radius across periods and down groups.
3.3. State and explain the trends in ionisation energies across periods and down groups.
3.4. State and explain the trends in
electronegativity across periods and down
groups.
3.5. Understand the trends in the properties of oxides, chlorides and hydrides across the Periodic Table.
3.6. Define the terms acidic, basic and
amphoteric oxides, and know the reactions
of some chlorides with water.
3.7. Deduce the electronic configurations and oxidation states of transition metal atoms and ions.
3.8. Explain what ligands are and how they
bond in transition metal complexes.
3.9. Explain and deduce coordination number in a transition metal-ligand complex.
3.10. Name transition metal-ligand complexes according to IUPAC rules.
3.11. Explain why some transition metal
complexes are coloured.
3.12. Understand how transition metals and their compounds can act as catalysts.
4. Understand functional groups,
naming organic compounds and
isomerism
4.1 Describe the concept of a functional group.
4.2 Convert between molecular, structural and skeletal formulae of compounds with no more than ten carbons in length.
4.3 Use the IUPAC nomenclature rules to
name the following simple organic compounds: alkanes, alkenes, alcohols,
aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids,
esters and arenes (one benzene ring with
one or more simple substituents).
4.4 Interpret and use the general, structural, and skeletal formulae of the following classes of compound: alkanes, alkenes and simple arenes; haloalkanes; alcohols; aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, esters and acyl chlorides.
4.5 Explain that stereoisomers are isomers
that have the same molecular formula but
differ in structural formulae (a different
spatial arrangement of their atoms).
4.6 Understand that geometric isomers are
stereoisomers where there is a lack of
rotation around one of the bonds mostly a
C=C.
4.7 Explain that these isomers are labelled cis and trans dependent on whether the
substitutes are on the same or different
sides of the C=C.
4.8 Recognise that optical isomers are nonsuperimposable mirror images of
asymmetric molecules and are referred to
as chiral molecules or enantiomers.
4.9 Explain how isomers can often have very different physical or chemical properties from each other.
5. Understand organic synthesis
reactions
5.1 Recognise and use different types of
reaction in organic synthesis including
substitution, addition, elimination,
condensation, hydrolysis, oxidation and
reduction.
5.2. Devise synthetic routes, with no more than three steps, from a given reactant to a final product.
5.3. Deduce the reactions that compounds can undergo by looking at their structures.
6. Understand aromatic (arene)
chemistry
6.1 Describe and explain the structure,
bonding and stability of the benzene ring.
6.2. Name and draw various aromatic
compounds.
6.3. Describe substitution reactions of
benzene: alkylation, nitration, sulfonation
and halogenation as examples of
electrophilic substitution in benzene and
other aromatic compounds.
6.4. Compare and contrast the electrophilic
addition reaction used by alkenes, to the
electrophilic substitution reaction used by
benzene.
7. Understand the techniques used in
organic analysis
7.1 Explain how mass spectrometry can be
used to determine the accurate molecular
mass and structural features of an organic
compound.
7.2. Explain how chromatographic techniques can be used to separate and identify components in a mixture.
7.3. Explain how elemental microanalysis can be used to work out an empirical formula.
7.4. Explain how infra-red spectroscopy can be used to identify certain functional groups in an organic compound and work out which compound is responsible for a spectra by identifying which functional groups are responsible for peaks.
7.5. Explain how proton nuclear magnetic
resonance spectroscopy (proton NMR)
can give information about the different
environments of hydrogen atoms in an
organic molecule, and how many hydrogen atoms there are in each of these
environments.

 

Syllabus Content
Topic Course coverage
Atomic structure
and stoichiometry
  • Protons, neutrons and electrons; their relative charges and relative masses.
  • Protons, neutrons and electrons present in atoms, isotopes and ions given mass and atomic numbers and vice versa.
  • Development of the models of atomic structure from Rutherford, via Bohr to Quantum Mechanics.
  • Quantum numbers, atomic orbitals and relative energies.
  • Atomic orbitals, their shape and their relative energies.
  • Electronic configuration of atoms 1-20 in spectroscopic notation.
  • Application of chemical formulae to show the relationships between mass, moles, gram formula mass, Avogadro’s constant, concentration and molar volume.
  • Simple acid-base titrations, back titrations, redox and complexometric titrations.
  • Uncertainties in experiments.

Learning Outcome: 1

Chemical
Bonding,
Structure and
Properties
  • Metallic bonding
  • Electronegativity and the bonding continuum to distinguish between covalent and ionic bonds
  • Ionic and covalent intramolecular chemical bonding
  • Dative covalent bonding and properties in term of melting and boiling points.
  • Intermolecular chemical bonding (‘van der Waals’):
    o London dispersion forces
    o Permanent dipole-permanent dipole interactions
    o Hydrogen bonding
  • Representations using ‘dot-and cross’ (Lewis) diagrams, shapes in some simple molecules and ions using Valence Shell Electron Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory

Learning Outcome: 1

Periodicity in the
Periodic Table
  • Trends in melting and boiling points due to bonding.
  • Trends in covalent radius across periods and down groups of the Periodic Table.
  • Trends in ionisation energies across periods and down groups of the Periodic Table.
  • Trends in electronegativity across periods and down groups of the Periodic Table.

Learning Outcome: 3

Transition Metal
Chemistry
  • Electronic configuration of transition metal atoms and ions.
  • Oxidation states of transition metals and ions.
  • Oxidation number during oxidation or reduction reactions.
  • Ligands in transition metal complexes
  • Coordination number.
  • Naming transition metal ligand complexes.
  • Transition metal complexes and colour.
  • Transition metals as catalysts.

Learning Outcome: 3

Chemical
Energetics
  • Enthalpy change (∆H).
  • Calorimetry (∆H=cm∆T).
  • Applications of Hess’s law, including Born-Haber Cycles.
  • Bond enthalpies

Learning Outcome: 2

Reaction-rates
and Kinetics
  • Collision theory.
  • Factors affecting the rate of a reaction.
  • Activation energy and the Maxwell-Boltzman energy distribution curve.
  • Order of a reaction (0, 1, 2, 3) from experimental data and rate equations.
  • Rate constants and units of k.
  • Rate equation, rate determining step and possible mechanism.

Learning Outcome: 2

Chemical
Equilibria
  • Equilibrium constant, k.
  • Composition of reaction mixtures, from the equilibrium equation.
  • Use of Kc and Kp values.
  • Types of chemical equilibria-homogeneous and heterogeneous.
  • Le Chatelier’s principle.
  • Equilibrium and catalysts.
  • Definitions of acid, base, conjugate acid and conjugate base.
  • Kw, the ionic product of water.
  • Ka and the strengths of acids and bases.
  • Calculating the pH of solutions of strong acids and bases from [H+] and the pH of solutions of weak acids from Ka values.

Learning Outcome: 2

Organic
nomenclature
and isomerism
  • Identification of organic compounds using functional groups.
  • Conversion between molecular, structural and skeletal formulae of compounds with no more than ten carbons in length.
  • IUPAC nomenclature rules for: alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and esters.
  • Optical isomers
    o Identifying and drawing enantiomers (R and S) using wedges and dashes.
    o Identification of chiral carbon centres.
    o Identification using polarimeter
  • Geometric isomerism
    o Formation of sigma and pi bonds on the C=C double bond (hybridisation may be used to explain bonding but will not be specifically examined).
    o Identifying and drawing Cis and Trans isomers.
    o Restricted rotation of the double bond to geometric isomerism.
    o Boiling point features of Cis and Trans isomers.
    o Compare and explain the melting point features of Cis and Trans isomers.

Learning Outcome: 4

Organic
Synthesis
Reactions- Part 1
  • Preparation and reactions of alkanes.
  • Preparation and reactions of alkenes.
  • Preparation and reactions of haloalkanes.

Learning Outcome: 5

Organic
Synthesis
Reactions- Part 2
  • Preparation and reactions of alcohols.
  • Preparation and reactions of carboxylic acids and acyl chlorides.
  • Esters – preparation, uses, percentage yield and atom economy.
  • Preparation and reactions of aldehydes and ketones.

Learning Outcome: 5

Aromatic
Chemistry
  • Drawing equations given parametrically by plotting points on the graph
  • Converting functions between their Cartesian form and parametric form
  • Differentiating curves given in parametric form
  • Tangents and normals to curves given parametrically
  • The second derivative

Learning Outcomes: 6

Coordinate
Systems
  • The structure, bonding and stability of the benzene ring.
  • Naming and drawing aromatic compounds (one benzene ring with one or more simple substituents).
  • How the pattern of electron density renders electrophilic attack the dominant reaction type in benzene.
  • Drawing and discussing the mechanisms for the following electrophilic substitution reactions: alkylation, nitration, sulfonation and halogenation.
  • Comparison of electrophilic addition reactions used by alkenes to the electrophilic substitution reaction used by benzene.

Learning Outcome: 6

Organic
Analysis
  • Introduction to mass spectrometry.
  • Interpretation of the mass spectra of various simple organic molecules.
  • Chromatographic techniques.
  • Elemental microanalysis
  • Background to Infrared spectroscopy.
  • Infrared spectroscopy in structure determination (functional group identification).
  • Background on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR).
  • Shielding and de-shielding related to the chemical shift values.
  • Use of tetramethysilane (TMS) as an internal standard.
  • Use of H-NMR in the determination of simple organic compound structure.

Learning Outcome: 7

 

Assessment Type 
  • Global Assignment (100%)
See also Section 3 above

 

o. Biology

Title Biology
Unit reference number Y/616/8689
Credits 10
Level 3

 

Guided Learning Hours 52 hours Total Qualification Time 100 hours

 

Learning Outcomes;
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria;
The Learner can:
1. Understand Cell Structure 1.1 Describe the components and function of cell membranes
1.2 Explain the movement of molecule and
ions across cell membranes
1.3 Describe the main organelles found in
human cells and explain their function
1.4 Explain how cell differentiation means
cells are adapted for roles in the body
2. Understand the systems involved
in the co-ordination and control of
the body
2.1 Describe the structures and explain
functions of the CNS and PNS.
2.2 Explain the transmission of impulses
across synapses.
2.3 Describe the components of the
Endocrine system.
2.4 Explain the concept of feedback loops,
with examples form the human body.
2.5 Describe of hormones in controlling
metabolism with Thyroxine as a named
example.
2.6 Explain the of hormones in controlling the menstrual cycle during pregnancy.
2.7 Describe the structure and function of the eyes, ears nose (in relation so smell),
mouth (in relation to taste) and the skin
(in relation to sensory perception))
3. Understand the systems involved
movement and energy release in
the body
3.1 Describe the structure and explain the
functions of the skeleton.
3.2 Describe the structure and explain the
functions of the three adult muscle types.
3.3 Describe and explain the function,
structure and components of human
circulatory systems.
3.4 Explain the specific function of the heart and how heart rate is governed.
3.5 Describe the structure, function and
control of the respiratory system.
3.6 Explain gas exchange.
3.7 Explain respiratory disease in relation to lung structure and function.
3.8 Explain the production of energy using
aerobic respiration and anaerobic
respiration to meet the bodies energy
requirements.
3.9 Explain the use of different sources of
energy in different circumstances, and
how this helps the body to cope with a
lack of food.
4. Understand how the body obtains
the nutrients it needs and
disposes of waste products
4.1 Describe and explain the structure of the digestive system.
4.2 Describe and explain the digestive
process which occur in the different areas
of the digestive system with reference to
enzymes and absorption.
4.3 Explain the basics of excretion through
the skin, digestive system and kidneys.
4.4 Explain the sources and roles of
macronutrients in the body.
4.5 Explain the sources and roles of example micronutrients in the body.
4.6 Link nutritional imbalance to disease.
5. Understand the body’s defences
against disease and infection
5.1 Describe and explain the bodies innate
immune system.
5.2 Describe and explain the bodies active
immune system.
5.3 Explain how vaccines work.
5.4 Explain how immune system faults can
cause illness.
6. Understand the process of
reproduction
6.1 Explain cell division by mitosis, to
produce genetically identical daughter
cells.
6.2 Explain cell division by meiosis to
produce genetically distinct gametes
6.3 Describe the main structures of the male and female reproduction systems.

 

Syllabus Content
Topic Course coverage
Cell Structure
  • Components and function of cell membranes
  • Movement across cell membranes
  • Cell organelles and their function
  • Cell differentiation for roles in the body, e.g. nerve cells

Learning Outcome: 1

Nervous System
  • Structure and function of the CNS
  • Structure and function of the PNS
  • Transmission of impulses across synapses

Learning Outcome: 2

Endocrine
System
  • Components of the Endocrine system
  • Concept of feedback loops
  • Role of hormones in controlling metabolism
  • Role of hormones in controlling the menstrual cycle
  • Roll of endocrine system during pregnancy

Learning Outcome: 2

Sense Organs
  • Structure and function of the eyes
  • Structure and function of the ears
  • Structure and function of the nose in relation so smell
  • Structure and function of the mouth in relation to taste
  • Sensory perception in the skin

Learning Outcome: 2

Skeleton
System and
Muscles
  • Structure and role of the skeleton
  • Structure and function of the three adult muscle types

Learning Outcome: 3

Circulation
  • The blood circulation systems.
  • The lymphatic circulation system
  • Comparative anatomy of blood vessels, and the reasons for these differences
  • Major blood vessels of the body and the key functionsStructure and function of the heart
  • Heart rhythms, blood pressure

Learning Outcome: 3

Respiration (gas
exchange)
  • The structure, function and control of the respiratory system.
  • Gas exchange.
  • Respiratory disease in relation to lung structure and function.

Learning Outcome: 3

Metabolism and
Cellular
Respiration
  • Production of energy using aerobic respiration
  • Production of energy using anaerobic respiration
  • Uses of different sources of energy in different circumstances

Learning Outcome: 3

Digestion and
Excretion
  • Structure of the digestive system
  • Digestion and absorption in different areas of the digestive tract
  • Role of the liver in digestion and excretion
  • Role of the kidneys in excretion
  • Role of skin in excretion

Learning Outcomes: 4

Nutrition
  • Main food groups and their sources
  • Role of macronutrients in the body
  • Role of Micronutrients in the body
  • Diseases caused by diet

Learning Outcome: 4

The immune
system
  • Barriers to infection
  • The Innate immune system.
  • The Adaptive immune system.
  • Vaccination.
  • Hypersensitivity, anaphylaxis, autoimmune disease and immunodeficiency.

Learning Outcomes: 5

Genetics and
reproduction
  • Cellular reproduction and growth
  • Meiosis and gamete production
  • Role of gametes in the mixing of genetic information
  • Structure of female reproductive organs
  • Structure of male reproductive organs

Learning Outcome: 6

 

Assessment Type 
  • Global Assignment (100%)
See also Section 3 above

 

Download: Level 3 International Foundation Diploma for Higher Education Studies Pdf: Here

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